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GO TO 1972

1973

GO TO 1974

AMERICAN GRAFFITI (dir: George Lucas, PG) - Michelle says, "The first night of college, I wandered up and down Main Street with a crowd of other students (that’s how all the freshmen moved, in enormous anxious groups) while every upper classman seemed to drive past us, heckling, 'Freshman!' When I tell people about it, I always say that it was like this movie, that wild but innocent social scene, being outside on a crowded bright street at night, making noise and trying to get attention. Except here, that scene is ending for these small town American kids, who are about to head to college and have a single night to resolve their apprehension about it. It’s a fun watch just for the cast, a super-young Richard Dreyfus, Ron Howard before his Happy Days and directing career, and newcomer Harrison Ford in his cowboy hat and big truck. It was only George Lucas’s second major movie, but its nostalgic sweetness and its confidence creates a more mature and evenhanded work than his next release, a little thing called STAR WARS."
SCARECROW (dir: Jerry Schatzberg, R) - Bart says, "I hate Al Pacino. I think he's an over-acting buffoon and I'm really glad I don't know him personally. That said, there are two films that I love him in. The first is DONNIE BRASCO, because his rampaging egomania makes the petty gangster character he plays seem that much more pathetic. The other is this nearly forgotten road movie he stars in with Gene Hackman where he plays such a sweet and goofy loser you forget it's him. Not a whole lot happens in this sad and funny little character study, but it's a perfect example of why you should care about American film in the Seventies."
PAT GARRETT & BILLY THE KID (dir: Sam Peckinpah, R) - Bart says, "Most people remember this film for Bob Dylan's soundtrack which features 'Knockin' On Heaven's Door,' and for his memorable performance in a small role. However, what these people seem to be missing is that this is one of the greatest Westerns ever made, and probably the last really important one (no offence UNFORGIVEN fans). Part of the problem is that the studio took the leisurely-paced film away from Peckinpah during editing, so it was originally released in a mangled form. But you need to watch the current, definitive version of this tribute to dudes who are willing to kill an obsolete outlaw buddy in order to keep that buddy's legend alive."
BADLANDS (dir: Terrence Malick, Not Rated)
DAY FOR NIGHT (dir: François Truffaut, Not Rated)
DON'T LOOK NOW (dir: Nicolas Roeg, Not Rated)
LADY SNOWBLOOD (dir: Toshiya Fujita, Not Rated)
THE LONG GOODBYE (dir: Robert Altman, Not Rated)
SCENES FROM A MARRIAGE (dir: Ingmar Bergman, Not Rated)
SLEEPER (dir: Woody Allen, Not Rated) 
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