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COMING SOON! NEW LAST WEEK! 2017 ARCHIVE! ALPHABETICAL CATALOG! CATALOG BY YEAR! BEST OF THE YEAR LISTS! GENERAL INFO! LINKS!

GO TO 1968

1969

GO TO 1970

PAINT YOUR WAGON (dir: Joshua Logan, PG-13) - Michelle says, "Before seventies cinema exposed the lonely, selfish, and seedy side of sexual liberation and substance abuse, the sixties offered us romping, naïve accounts of similar exploits. Enter one of last big budget, glossy musicals of its era – a movie about the civilizing effect of women on the wild frontier. Though it’s set in the mid-1800s, the story actually comments on free love in California sixties-style, as the headstrong second wife of a Mormon arrives in a boomtown and takes up with two husbands – an unusually sincere, soft-spoken, and pretty Clint Eastwood and his business partner, Lee Marvin, a wild alcoholic prospector. What follows doesn’t make a whole lot of sense by narrative standards, but it sure is better than what happens to sexually liberated folks in California when Mormons show up nowadays."
JOHN AND MARY (dir: Peter Yates, R) - Michelle says, "Though it lacks the punch of its stars’ contemporary landmark films – Hoffman’s social critiques THE GRADUATE and MIDNIGHT COWBOY, and Farrow’s terrifying ROSEMARY’S BABY – JOHN AND MARY does speak to the shifting mores of its generation, taking on casual sex and adultery honestly as adult choices, before lapsing into a safe, conformist resolution in line with the characters’ Christian names. Still, in its handling of race and gender, this date movie has more to offer a thinking audience than most anything being made today about living single in New York."
Z (dir: Costa-Gavras, PG) - Michelle says, "Based on a military coup in Greece in the 60s, this political thriller is more atmospheric than focused on the specific motives for a right wing cover-up of a left-wing politician’s murder at a peace rally. The bad guys want power and the good guys are either eliminated or silenced for seeking the truth. Critic Louise Erdrich points out the limited and negative roles for women and gay men in Costa Gavras’s film, but its broad stroke approach will still resonate with anyone riled by fascism and corruption. And if you don’t care about that stuff, well, Yves Montaud and Irene Papas sure know how to look sexy while they fight the Man and mourn their losses."
THEY SHOOT HORSES, DON'T THEY? (dir: Sydney Pollack, PG) – Greg says, "If you want to teach your kids what it’s going to be like during the impending global financial apocalypse, show them this bummer of epic proportions set in The Great Depression. Jane Fonda and Michael Sarrazin play young hoofers competing in a degradingly inhumane dance marathon in Atlantic City. The last couple to not keel over and die wins like $50 or something, which was a lot of brass during those wretched times. Gig Young won the Oscar for Supporting Actor for his role as the master of ceremonies and, only a few years later, took a cue from the movie and painted his walls with the contents of his head. Yowza! Yowza! Yowza!"
BOB & CAROL & TED & ALICE (dir: Paul Mazursky, Not Rated)
BURN! (dir: Gillo Pontecorvo, Not Rated)
BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID (dir: George Roy Hill, Not Rated)
EASY RIDER (dir: Dennis Hopper, Not Rated)
MIDNIGHT COWBOY (dir: John Schlesinger, Not Rated)
MY NIGHT AT MAUD'S (dir: Eric Rohmer, Not Rated)
THE PRIME OF MISS JEAN BRODIE (dir: Ronald Neame, Not Rated)
THE WILD BUNCH (dir: Sam Peckinpah, Not Rated)
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