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GO TO 1966

1967

GO TO 1968

OEDIPUS REX (dir: Pier Paolo Pasolini, Not Rated) - Michelle says, "You know how all the drama in Greek tragedy happens in the past or off-stage, and all you get is a bunch of people standing around yelling about it for like two hours? Well apparently, Pasolini shared Freud’s fascination with the dude who killed his dad and sexed up his mom. His reel of awesome dramatizes Sophocles’ naughty back story in a bizarre setting that is equal parts ancient, arty, and modern. Basicially, it’s the Romans appropriating Greek culture as usual, but they’re doing it in silly hats."
THE YOUNG GIRLS OF ROCHEFORT (dir: Jacques Demy / Agnès Varda, Not Rated) - Bart says, "There are are lots of reasons you should see this movie. You get to see Catherine Deneuve play sister to her real life sister, Françoise Dorléac. You get a reteaming of director Jacques Demy and composer Michel Legrand for a musical follow-up to their beautiful THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG. You get the original AMERICAN IN PARIS, Gene Kelly, in an actual French movie. But the most important reason to see this movie is... the dancing! Now, I'm not too sophisticated when it comes to the choreographic arts, but I know what I like, and that's lots of people making the same rhythmic motions at the same time. And they sure do a lot of it in this movie and do it really energetically and really well."
POINT BLANK (dir: John Boorman, Not Rated) – Bart says, "With the influence of French New Wave and a lowering of moral standards, there's no denying that American movies reached their pinnacle of awesomeness in the Seventies. But I have a theory that cinema's coolest decade actually began in 1967 with BONNIE & CLYDE and this stylish Lee Marvin tour-de-force where he plays a p.o.'d thug who gets his revenge on the criminals who double-crossed him. Crazy camera angles, disorienting editing, disturbing violence - this film sparked an era of daring and exciting filmmaking. Sadly, it all ended in 1976 with invention of the Summer Blockbuster, somewhere between the releases of JAWS and STAR WARS."
BONNIE AND CLYDE (dir: Arthur Penn, Not Rated)
COOL HAND LUKE (dir: Stuart Rosenberg, Not Rated)
THE GRADUATE (dir: Mike Nichols, Not Rated)
IN COLD BLOOD (dir: Richard Brooks, Not Rated)
IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT (dir: Norman Jewison, Not Rated)
LE SAMOURAÏ (dir: Jean-Pierre Melville, Not Rated)
PLAY TIME (dir: Jacques Tati, Not Rated)
THE SHOOTING (dir: Monte Hellman, Not Rated)
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